Category Archives: galleries & venues

Lytham Hall part2

Lytham Hall – venue for the Spring Art Market 2015

It was super to take part in such a lovely art and craft event – an interesting historical venue, an amazing standard of selected North-West arts and crafts, a well organised and promoted event and great to meet visitors interested in arts and crafts.

We were lucky, it was sunny on the Saturday and the event started off buzzing with visitors, it then eased off, with a steady number of people looking round… which was pretty good, considering the time of year and that Lytham Hall is a bit of the beaten track. It was an enjoyable event to be part of; an opportunity to meet interesting artists and visitors and its always lovely when my jewellery gets compliments and some of it goes off to new homes. Samantha x

Interview with Hopeful and Glorious:

“There are such amazing talented artists and craftspeople in the North-West, and we’ve often been frustrated with events we’ve attended as makers and as visitors.

“All the Hopeful and Glorious fairs are selected. Artists apply, sending images of their work with their application. This helps ensure that there is a good quality and range of work, without a duplication of similar arts and crafts. Its important to us to make it an interesting and enjoyable event for both the artists taking part and the people coming to visit the event.

Lytham Hall
from small seeds…

“We are particularly keen to support artists and designer-makers from the North of England, not just via the fair, but also from the extra promotion on our website, social media and press releases.

“The Spring Art Fair at Lytham Hall is followed by an event in May at the Museum of Lancashire, and there is small program of further events planned at interesting Lancashire venues.”

Visit the Hopeful & Glorious website for more info

Hopefully, more people will come along and help support these events, take the opportunity to meet the makers and artists, help to publicise them and maybe buy some local handmade arts and crafts. Samantha x

Further links:

venue Lytham Hall
photos: artist Andy Walmsley, artist Katie – Sketchbuck, textile artist Diana Morrison, screenprinters and illustrators Bullie.

Lytham Hall part1

historical Lancashire venue for the Hopeful & Glorious Spring 2015 Art Market

I took these photos on my iphone on a cold February day, as I had a flying visit to Lytham Hall after taking some jewellery pieces into the Drift Gallery in nearby St. Anne’s.

Lytham Hall is a hidden treasure, as I’ve been going to Lytham and St Anne’s for many years and never even knew of its existence… I will be there this April with a selection of my jewelart jewellery at the Spring Art Market.

The Spring Art Market is held on Saturday 11 and Sunday 12 April and is open from 11-4pm in the West Wing area, next to the courtyard and above the cafe. There is free entry and limited car parking, or park nearby in Lytham and walk through the Hall grounds and parkland.
There will be over 25 stalls of glorious handmade arts and crafts. Its a great opportunity to meet and chat to the artists / designer-makers about their work and perhaps buy something a bit different.

Watch a video from the Winter Art Market 2014 at Lytham Hall on the Hopeful & Glorious website

History info from Wikipedia (rewritten) 
Lytham Hall is an 18th Century Georgian Country House in Lytham, Lancashire, situated a mile from the centre of town in 78 acres of wooded parkland.

Its history goes back much further, as it was recorded as ‘Lidun’ in the doomsday book of 1086. Then, in the 12th Century it was given to Benedictine monks of Durham Priory for the foundation of a monastic cell, Lytham Priory.
Following the dissolution of the Monasteries in the 1530s it passed through various hands, before being acquired by local landowner and staunch catholic Cuthbert Clifton in 1606 who built a house on the land. His descendant, Thomas Clifton replaced the house with the current Hall, which was built 1757-1764 to the design of John Carr of York in the Palladian style. For the next 200 years, the Clifton estate at its largest comprised 8,000 acres.

During the stewardship of Colonel John Talbot Clifton the railway was built along the estate’s southern boundary and housing built on part of the land, the Clifton estates building many of the fine houses along Clifton Drive in Lytham.

His colourful grandson John Talbot Clifton took over in 1882 at the age of 14. During the First World War Lytham Hall was used as a military hospital and afterwards the Clifton family moved to Ireland – and then onto Scotland, he was a passionate traveller and died on an expedition to Timbuktoo in 1928.  His wife Violet Beauclerk was the last person to live in the house.

Their son, Henry De Vere Clifton managed to squander the rest of the Clifton fortune and Lytham Hall and the remaining estate was sold off in the 1960s and the Hall was used for a while as office accommodation.

Lytham Hall is a grade 1 listed building, on the Heritage at Risk register and was purchased by Lytham Town Trust in 1997 with a donation from BAE systems and is currently leased to the Heritage Trust for the North West.

More info on Lytham Hall

Let me know if any of the Lytham Hall info is incorrect and I’ll amend it. Samantha x

Signature Gallery

A small selection of my contemporary wirework jewellery is now (Feb15) for sale at the Signature Gallery in Kendal, including these red vintage button earrings. 

This is the first of my series of blogs on the galleries and event venues where my jewellery is for sale.

The Signature Gallery in Kirkland

Signature Gallery was established in 1997 by Peter Blaskett.

Inside this quaint gallery is a changing display of original 19th Century watercolours and modern art. As well as a small selection of ceramics, sculptures and jewellery. There is a regular exhibitions program with solo artists and group shows (mostly local artists).

The gallery offers a quality picture framing service, from simple photo frames to full museum conservation framing.

www.signature-gallery.co.uk

Kendal photo

Signature Gallery is located across from Abbot Hall Museum and Art Gallery and car park in historic Kirkland. Abbot Hall is a restored Georgian town house, its stable block is home to the Museum of Lakeland Life and Industry, showing life in Cumbria over the past 3 hundred years.

Kendal photo
historic Kirkland

Kirkland, is known as the ‘cultural quarter’ of Kendal and its history can be traced back to the 8th century, when the settlement of Kirkland was established near a crossing point over the River Kent. The church built here was given to St Mary’s Abbey in York and Kirkland became a monastic estate administered from a nearby manor house.

The name Kirkland stems from ‘Kirkja’ old Norse for church and ‘land’, which has the same meaning as today, an enclosure or area of land.

Kendal photo
The New Shambles in Kendal

Kendal is known as the ‘gateway’ to the Lake District, being just outside the Lake District National park and only 8 miles from Windermere.

Its a market town – it received its market charter in 1189 – and it developed to the north of monastic Kirkland. They’re separated by the ancient boundary of the Black Beck.

The local barons laid out the town of Kendal with long burgage plots behind the street frontages, these were accessed through archways, which developed over time to become ‘yards’ filled with weaving, dyeing, shearing, salting and tanning workshops. The market town of Kendal developed rapidly as a trade centre for local goods, especially the woollen industry.

Kendal is situated in a valley on the River Kent and this is where its old Norse name stems from. Kendal = River Kent Valley. It was originally called ‘Kirkby in Kendal’ or ‘Kirkby Kendal’; ‘Kirkby’ is old Norse for church village.

Kirkland remained an independent township of Kendal until it was absorbed into the borough of Kendal in 1908, the administrative centre of Westmorland. Kendal is now the commercial centre of South Lakeland.

Kendal photo

After visiting the gallery, I enjoyed the rest of the afternoon in Kendal. I love wandering down the ‘gates’, small streets,  lanes and alleyways and reading about the history of Kendal on its civic signs that are dotted about.

Its a lovely old market town and when I visit it in better weather, I take a picnic and walk up to the castle ruins or along paths by the river… and I’m looking forward to my next visit.
Samantha x

History resources Kendal, Kirkland, place names and plaques:
cumbria county history
place names
placques