Tag Archives: Hopeful and Glorious

Lytham Hall Winter Art Fair 2016

It was lovely to be back at Lytham Hall to take part in the first weekend of the Hopeful and Glorious Winter Art Fairs 2016. Despite the bad weather on the Saturday – a mix of rain, snow, sleet and hail – thankfully it improved and we had some sunshine on the Sunday, which made a big difference, everyone seemed happier, we had lots of visitors and a better day all round.

There’s always a great selection of arts and crafts, and I have to admit that I get a bit of stall envy looking at how some people display their work… So, with this in mind, I’d been recently trying to revamp and de-clutter my display, especially as I need to make room for some new glass designs. Quite a few of my ‘classic design’ sterling silver bead earrings have moved into a ‘sale section’ and I’ve been making a new display for my glass jewellery with a gorgeous vintage frame that I’d discovered a few months ago in a charity shop.

new glass display
putting together my new vintage display

It takes time getting together all the bits and pieces for the display; the felt, wadding, netting etc and to figure out how to get it to stand upright and attach it to my stall. Luckily, I had help from ASC, a shop in Chorley (its a DIY suppliers, that sell allsorts of fittings and fixtures, wood etc), a really nice guy helped me out there and I was able to get my display finished and ready in time for this event at Lytham Hall.

“I’m chuffed to bits with this gorgeous display! I don’t know if I’ll ever manage minimal, but its looking a bit better.”

Its a hidden gem, a beautiful building in a lovely location that’s brought back to life hosting the arts and crafts fair. Hopeful and Glorious do a brilliant job, selecting the 30 plus artists, managing and promoting it. I’ve really seen it grow since the first event 2 years ago, which is great for Lancashire art and craft as we have very few really good events for us to showcase our work and we usually have to travel further afield to do events.

Enjoyed taking part in it, catching up with other artists and friends that came to visit, and having the opportunity for visitors to see my work. Even better, my jewellery got lots of compliments and some of it went off to new homes.
Samantha, jewellery artist x

“I look forward to hopefully being back there again at another glorious event in the Spring!”

more info: 
Lytham Hall, Lytham, Lancashire
Hopeful and Glorious, art and craft fairs in Lancashire
ASC Chorley, Timber Supplies and DIY store, Chorley, Lancashire

an earlier blog post from 2015 with more photos and info about Lytham Hall

Lytham Hall part2

Lytham Hall – venue for the Spring Art Market 2015

It was super to take part in such a lovely art and craft event – an interesting historical venue, an amazing standard of selected North-West arts and crafts, a well organised and promoted event and great to meet visitors interested in arts and crafts.

We were lucky, it was sunny on the Saturday and the event started off buzzing with visitors, it then eased off, with a steady number of people looking round… which was pretty good, considering the time of year and that Lytham Hall is a bit of the beaten track. It was an enjoyable event to be part of; an opportunity to meet interesting artists and visitors and its always lovely when my jewellery gets compliments and some of it goes off to new homes. Samantha x

Interview with Hopeful and Glorious:

“There are such amazing talented artists and craftspeople in the North-West, and we’ve often been frustrated with events we’ve attended as makers and as visitors.

“All the Hopeful and Glorious fairs are selected. Artists apply, sending images of their work with their application. This helps ensure that there is a good quality and range of work, without a duplication of similar arts and crafts. Its important to us to make it an interesting and enjoyable event for both the artists taking part and the people coming to visit the event.

Lytham Hall
from small seeds…

“We are particularly keen to support artists and designer-makers from the North of England, not just via the fair, but also from the extra promotion on our website, social media and press releases.

“The Spring Art Fair at Lytham Hall is followed by an event in May at the Museum of Lancashire, and there is small program of further events planned at interesting Lancashire venues.”

Visit the Hopeful & Glorious website for more info

Hopefully, more people will come along and help support these events, take the opportunity to meet the makers and artists, help to publicise them and maybe buy some local handmade arts and crafts. Samantha x

Further links:

venue Lytham Hall
photos: artist Andy Walmsley, artist Katie – Sketchbuck, textile artist Diana Morrison, screenprinters and illustrators Bullie.

Lytham Hall part1

historical Lancashire venue for the Hopeful & Glorious Spring 2015 Art Market

I took these photos on my iphone on a cold February day, as I had a flying visit to Lytham Hall after taking some jewellery pieces into the Drift Gallery in nearby St. Anne’s.

Lytham Hall is a hidden treasure, as I’ve been going to Lytham and St Anne’s for many years and never even knew of its existence… I will be there this April with a selection of my jewelart jewellery at the Spring Art Market.

The Spring Art Market is held on Saturday 11 and Sunday 12 April and is open from 11-4pm in the West Wing area, next to the courtyard and above the cafe. There is free entry and limited car parking, or park nearby in Lytham and walk through the Hall grounds and parkland.
There will be over 25 stalls of glorious handmade arts and crafts. Its a great opportunity to meet and chat to the artists / designer-makers about their work and perhaps buy something a bit different.

Watch a video from the Winter Art Market 2014 at Lytham Hall on the Hopeful & Glorious website

History info from Wikipedia (rewritten) 
Lytham Hall is an 18th Century Georgian Country House in Lytham, Lancashire, situated a mile from the centre of town in 78 acres of wooded parkland.

Its history goes back much further, as it was recorded as ‘Lidun’ in the doomsday book of 1086. Then, in the 12th Century it was given to Benedictine monks of Durham Priory for the foundation of a monastic cell, Lytham Priory.
Following the dissolution of the Monasteries in the 1530s it passed through various hands, before being acquired by local landowner and staunch catholic Cuthbert Clifton in 1606 who built a house on the land. His descendant, Thomas Clifton replaced the house with the current Hall, which was built 1757-1764 to the design of John Carr of York in the Palladian style. For the next 200 years, the Clifton estate at its largest comprised 8,000 acres.

During the stewardship of Colonel John Talbot Clifton the railway was built along the estate’s southern boundary and housing built on part of the land, the Clifton estates building many of the fine houses along Clifton Drive in Lytham.

His colourful grandson John Talbot Clifton took over in 1882 at the age of 14. During the First World War Lytham Hall was used as a military hospital and afterwards the Clifton family moved to Ireland – and then onto Scotland, he was a passionate traveller and died on an expedition to Timbuktoo in 1928.  His wife Violet Beauclerk was the last person to live in the house.

Their son, Henry De Vere Clifton managed to squander the rest of the Clifton fortune and Lytham Hall and the remaining estate was sold off in the 1960s and the Hall was used for a while as office accommodation.

Lytham Hall is a grade 1 listed building, on the Heritage at Risk register and was purchased by Lytham Town Trust in 1997 with a donation from BAE systems and is currently leased to the Heritage Trust for the North West.

More info on Lytham Hall

Let me know if any of the Lytham Hall info is incorrect and I’ll amend it. Samantha x